Welcome to the May 2014 Carnival of Natural Parenting: Ages and Stages

This post was written for inclusion in the monthly Carnival of Natural Parenting hosted by Hobo Mama and Code Name: Mama. This month our participants have talked about their children’s most rewarding and most challenging developmental periods. Please read to the end to find a list of links to the other carnival participants.

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THREE-YEAR-OLD EXUBERANCE IN THE

MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

 Spending the day with a three-year-old in New York City is a day that requires a lot of energy and focus. Eric is a pint size charmer who speaks up to everyone. On the train into the City a friendly stranger said, “What’s your name?” Jumping out of his seat and standing up he declared, “My name is Eric. We’re going to the Museum of Natural History!”

I had to remind him over and over to hold my hand and stay by my side at all times. Walking through crowds and racing into the museum, I had terrible fears of him being snatched up by someone. On line at the ticket booth, I listed four choices of special exhibits. He said boldly: “I want to see the butterflies!”  Then he added with his delightful vigor: “But first let’s see the dinosaurs.” We had a plan designed by Eric with no hesitation.

SHOWING  SELF-CONFIDENCE

AND FEELING PROUD

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAfter the excitement of the huge dinosaurs, our next stop in the Museum was the live butterfly exhibit. Eric listened intently as the exhibit leader gave him instructions on how to behave with the butterflies. He pointed and gasped as they flew all around him. Then he directed me to look in a large netted cage where he announced there was a giant moth. I have no idea how he knew that it was a moth, not a butterfly. But he was right and very proud of himself. He knew how to stand up for what he believed was correct. Understanding how a three-year-old’s mind works helps a mother appreciate his accomplishments. Then you know the meaning of his behavior. This is an example of parental intelligence.

For a second, I thought I lost him as he ran over to a large butterfly that turned a bright orange when it opened its wings. But there he was a few feet away from me showing the museum leader what he just found. Once again, he stood right up for his discovery.

So little, so precious, but such a belief in himself and his knowledge.

Later at dinner, I asked him: “Eric, which did you like better the dinosaurs or the butterflies?” He paused and thought before he replied, “I liked the dinosaurs and the butterflies.” He had a mind of his own. Then I commented about what a happy day I had with him and he said, “You’re my best friend.” He took his time and then added: “And I’m my best friend.”

It’s a wonder to see such confidence in a

three-year-old!

Click here to read more about how three-year-olds’ minds work, their confidence, and reasoning abilities.

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Carnival of Natural Parenting -- Hobo Mama and Code Name: MamaVisit Hobo Mama and Code Name: Mama to find out how you can participate in the next Carnival of Natural Parenting!

Please take time to read the submissions by the other carnival participants:

(This list will be updated by afternoon May 13 with all the carnival links.)

  • When Three-Year-Olds Stand Up For Themselves — Parenting Expert Laurie Hollman, Ph.D. at her blog, Parental Intelligence, enjoys the stage when three-year-olds dramatically wow their parents with their strong sense of self.
  • This too shall pass — In the beginning, everything seems so overwhelming. Amanda at My Life in a Nutshell looks at the stages of the first 1.5 years of her daughter’s life and explains how nothing is ever static and everything changes – the good and the bad.
  • Age 5 – Is It Really A Golden Period? — Jennifer at Hybrid Rasta Mama looks at the developmental norms for the five-year-old set and muses over if this age really is the ‘golden period.’
  • How much do you explain to your preschooler when crime touches close to home? — When tragedy strikes someone your preschooler knows, Nathalie at Kampuchea Crossings wonders how parents can best help young children cope.
  • Thoughts on ToddlerwearingThat Mama Gretchen‘s babywearing days are over, we’re living it up in the toddlerwearing days now!
  • Parenting Challenges—Almost a man — Survivor at Surviving Mexico talks about leaving childhood behind as her son turns 12.
  • How Child Development Works — Competence Builds Competences — Debbie at Equipped Family shares how each stage of childhood builds on the next. Focus on doing the current stage reasonably well and success will breed success!
  • Making Space — Kellie at Our Mindful Life is adjusting her thinking and making room for her babies to stay near her.
  • The Best Parenting Resources for Parents of Toddlers — Toddlers can be so challenging. Not only are they learning how to exert their independence, but they simply do not have the developmental ability to be calm and logical when they are frustrated. It’s the nature of the beast. I mean … the toddler. Here are Dionna at Code Name: Mama‘s favorite books and articles about parenting a toddler.
  • The Fab Five Stages so Far — Laura from Pug in the Kitchen couldn’t choose just one stage for this carnival and is sharing her top five favorite stages in the young lives of her son and daughter at Natural Parents Network.
  • The best parts of ages 0-6 — Lauren at Hobo Mama gives a breakdown of what to expect and what to cherish in each year.
  • Lessons from Parenting a Three-Year-Old — Ana and Niko at Panda & Ananaso are quickly approaching the end of an era — toddlerhood. She shares some of her thoughts on the last two years and some tips on parenting through a time rife with change.
  • Feeling Needed — Jorje of Momma Jorje ponders which developmental stage is her favorite and why. She bares it for us, seemingly without fear of judgment. You might be surprised by her answer!

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Carnival of Natural Parenting -- Hobo Mama and Code Name: MamaVisit Hobo Mama and Code Name: Mama to find out how you can participate in the next Carnival of Natural Parenting!

Please take time to read the submissions by the other carnival participants:

(This list will be updated by afternoon May 13 with all the carnival links.)

  • Making Space — Kellie at Our Mindful Life is adjusting her thinking and making room for her babies to stay near her.
  • The Best Parenting Resources for Parents of Toddlers — Toddlers can be so challenging. Not only are they learning how to exert their independence, but they simply do not have the developmental ability to be calm and logical when they are frustrated. It’s the nature of the beast. I mean … the toddler. Here are Dionna at Code Name: Mama‘s favorite books and articles about parenting a toddler.
  • The Fab Five Stages so Far — Laura from Pug in the Kitchen couldn’t choose just one stage for this carnival and is sharing her top five favorite stages in the young lives of her son and daughter at Natural Parents Network.
  • The best parts of ages 0-6 — Lauren at Hobo Mama gives a breakdown of what to expect and what to cherish in each year.
  • Lessons from Parenting a Three-Year-Old — Ana and Niko at Panda & Ananaso are quickly approaching the end of an era — toddlerhood. She shares some of her thoughts on the last two years and some tips on parenting through a time rife with change.
  • Feeling Needed — Jorje of Momma Jorje ponders which developmental stage is her favorite and why. She bares it for us, seemingly without fear of judgment. You might be surprised by her answer!

9 Comments

  1. Lauren @ Hobo Mama on May 13, 2014 at 3:28 am

    We’re in the midst of that with our little almost-three! It’s so fun to see the confidence and independence they have in abundance.

  2. […] When Three-Year-Olds Stand Up For Themselves — Parenting Expert Laurie Hollman, Ph.D. at her blog, Parental Intelligence, enjoys the stage when three-year-olds dramatically wow their parents with their strong sense of self. […]

  3. […] When Three-Year-Olds Stand Up For Themselves — Parenting Expert Laurie Hollman, Ph.D. at her blog, Parental Intelligence, enjoys the stage when three-year-olds dramatically wow their parents with their strong sense of self. […]

  4. Survivor on May 13, 2014 at 10:14 am

    What a cute story! You are so right! Three year olds have their own minds!

  5. Debbie on May 13, 2014 at 11:10 am

    Sounds like a wonderful visit to the museum, Laurie. This 3 year old’s confidence and exuberance is no doubt due in part to his family cultivating and welcoming those qualities. Thinking about attachment, he has the expectation that others will take an interest in what he has to offer. He is willing to trust and to claim you as a best friend. How wonderful!

    • Laurie Hollman, Ph.D. on May 14, 2014 at 12:37 pm

      I agree that it is so important to know others will take an interest. I think when parents enjoy their kids, their kids know it and develop a great sense of self.
      Thanks for your comment.
      Laurie

  6. Laura on May 13, 2014 at 1:16 pm

    What an empowering day for him to choose the itinerary! And what a joy to experience it alongside him!

  7. Nathalie on May 13, 2014 at 10:07 pm

    Times when we can fully tune in to our kids, engage, and draw out their developing personalities are such a treat. They’re an open book at this age. My 3yo is very social and seems to know how to read people to charm them just right, so your day out sounds like it’s familiar 🙂 But it took many challenging periods to get to this point since he’s a very “spirited” kid. I constantly learn from him about how to deal with people lol. The butterfly exhibit is well done – such a shame we’ll miss it when we visit home this summer!

    • Laurie Hollman, Ph.D. on May 14, 2014 at 12:35 pm

      Reading people is a gift. This is a true milestone for age three. Enjoy watching that social talent!
      Laurie

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